May 2013
Books
Biography
Archive
Feedback
Home
Home
Billie Silvey
May 2013
Alfred Stieglitz--
Photography as Art
Iconic photo of Depression era mother
and children (left); Dorothea Lange
(right); family in Depression (below).
Modern Art began at the turn of the twentieth century,
influenced by a series of painters.  But perhaps the
most influential force in the movement was a
photographer,
Alfred Stieglitz.  

Stieglitz joined the
Camera Club of New York in 1896,
and managed and edited its quarterly journal,
Camera
Notes.

Six years later, he left the club and established the
Photo-Secession group, with its journal, Camera
Work.

In 1905, he founded the first of three New York
galleries, the Little Galleries of the Photo Secession at
291 Fifth Avenue.  It later became known simply as
291.  His gallery space was used to display the work of
both painters and photographers.

He encouraged the work of early American modernist
painters like Arthur
Dove, John Marin and Georgia
O'Keeffe.  In 1924, he and O'Keeffe married.

His early works emphasized weather and the
atmosphere.  In his famous photograph
Steerage  
(below) he applies cubism to photography.
Alfred Stieglitz (left), in his photo of
his wife,
Georgia O'Keeffe (right), and
his picture of two towers in a New
York winter scene (below), explores
the possibilities of using photography
to produce art.
May 2013
Dorothea Lange
Ansel Adams